THE FACTS ABOUT HUMAN TRAFFICKING IN AMERICA; The truth from a SURVIVOR!!

Human Trafficking: by Delana Forsyth

Dear Delana,

1600 Daily

The White House • October 21, 2020

Democrats want to abolish ICE. President Trump wants to help ICE abolish human trafficking.

In 2018 alone, more than 23,000 human trafficking victims were identified in the United States. Of these victims, 65% were women. More than 1 in 5 were children.

It’s a “level of evil that you would never believe is even possible in a modern age,” President Trump said in January. “The level of evil is incredible.”

President Trump has joined law enforcement officers to fight for the voiceless and end this scourge of modern-day slavery in our country. U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE)—which Democrats have called to be abolished—has arrested more than 5,000 human traffickers over just the past three years.

“I want to thank ICE. They have been incredible,” President Trump said.

Rather than dismantle law enforcement agencies, as the far left demands, President Trump has doubled funding for the Department of Justice to combat human trafficking.

The President also signed the largest DOJ grant package in history to stop trafficking. It included, for the first time ever, grants to provide safe housing for survivors.

All told, since taking office, President Trump has signed nine pieces of bipartisan legislation that target human traffickers, both domestically and internationally.

This week, the Trump Administration released its National Action Plan to build on these important steps. It lays out a strategy in three parts: prevention of trafficking, protection for victims, and prosecution for the criminals who fuel this evil industry.

In January, President Trump recognized the 20th Anniversary of the Trafficking Victims Protection Act. That day, he signed an Executive Order on Combating Human Trafficking and Online Child Exploitation in the United States. With that order, he created the first-ever White House position focused solely on ending trafficking.

Americans also heard that day from Bella Hounakey, a survivor of trafficking whom President Trump invited to speak at the White House.

“At age 13, I was brought into this country. I survived trafficking, along with 19 other girls. Afterwards, I was placed in foster care, but this negative experience in my past should not wholly define who I am today,” she said.

“Today, I am a college graduate. Today, I am an American citizen.”

Last fiscal year, ICE initiated 1,024 human-trafficking and forced-labor related cases. These actions led to 2,197 criminal arrests, nearly 700 convictions, and, ultimately, the rescue of more than 400 victims.

📖 The Trump Administration Is Fighting the Evil of Human Trafficking

Under President Trump, our First Americans are being put first again!

President Trump is committed to honoring the heritage of America’s first inhabitants, our Native American communities. To that end, his Administration just released a plan to continue partnering with Native Americans to build a brighter future for all people.

The plan, titled “Putting America’s First Peoples First: Forgotten No More,” outlines President Trump’s core principles to fight for these communities:

  • Respecting tribal sovereignty and self-determination
     
  • Promoting safe communities
     
  • Building a thriving economy with improved infrastructure
     
  • Honoring Native American heritage and improving education
     
  • Delivering better health outcomes

President Trump’s policies will add 51,000 Native American-owned businesses and up to 196,000 new jobs for tribal communities. In addition, tribal entrepreneurship will be supported through growing opportunities for access to Federal contracting.

With a priority on education, Federal investments will be increased in tribal colleges and universities, and $10 million is pledged to support the creation of new tribally operated charter schools. Federal funding will be doubled for the improvement of quality Bureau of Indian Education schools and other education options, as well.

The plan also continues to prioritize the important work of Operation Lady Justice, President Trump’s task force to address missing and murdered indigenous persons.

MORE: How the White House Is Seeking Justice for Native Americans

Photo of the Day

President Trump disembarks Air Force One in Erie, Pennsylvania | October 21, 2020

The White House · 1600 Pennsylvania Ave NW · Washington, DC 20500 · USA · 202-456-1111

May 5th is Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women Awareness Day (MMIW); a movement to bring recognition to the disappearance and murders of Native women and girls.

Today, we acknowledge the Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women epidemic which has especially skyrocketed during the past year.

The U.S Department of Justice finds that American Indian women face murder rates that are more than 10 times the national average, and going missing at a rate of more than 5,000 every year since 2016.

There are many factors contributing to this raging epidemic against our sisters ranging from individual to societal, and therefore many intersections at which this devastation multiplies.

Today, we encourage you to make a difference with your attention and awareness for Native Women.

I have been doing research on human trafficking for many years. everything that I am write is the truth, things i have seen and experienced. Human Trafficking is an American problem as well. I worked in New York, when I was 20. the first day, I had only been there a few minutes the owner made me have sex with him. This had been in the lower east side of New York, You don’t say no or you could find yourself, dead, or next to dead. By that time you wish you were. It’s not just the sex you get into, you have to be numb to all of this, so you start use drugs. Both go together no matter what. Human Trafficking occurs for many purposes.  Most women and children are trafficked for prostitution, some for marriage, and many are exploited. Women who are trafficked for domestic labor often end up being sexually exploited as well. This is not just a problem for women; many children are trafficked for adoption. Of any means everything to many poor countries. In these countries it has become increasingly high, especially in Africa children there are being trafficked for organs. There are enormous difficulties in producing accurate assessments of trafficking.

∙    The International Organization of Migration (IOM) attempted to estimate numbers of trafficked women in Europe for the European Union and concluded that accurate numbers were not possible.

∙    However, the United Nations estimates that trafficking is about a 5 to7 billion dollar operation annually. There are about 4 million (people) persons moved from one country to another and within countries.

∙    The U.S. government estimates that 50,000 women and children are trafficked each year into the United States, primarily from Latin America, Russia, the New Independent State, and Southeast Asia.

∙    Child sexual exploitation has grown especially in all countries, but especially in Asian and Latin America countries. Travel agencies, hotels, airlines, businesses,and so called, child protectors are often involved in sex tourism.

∙    Some child sexual abusers seems to think that they can avoid AIDS, if they have sex with children, but more often, they seek out children because can be made to fulfill the abusers demands.

∙    Organized crime is certainly involved in trafficking, but in many cases trafficker and pimp are small-scale operators who are husbands and boy-friends of victims. 

∙    Women trafficked into the United State, for example, often through other transit countries or across borders. The women are trafficked by cars, bus, boats, and planes.

∙    The condition of trafficking range from force or coercion to deception. Abuse of power, or abuse of a victim’s vulnerability. Many women are deceived into thinking they will work as domestic, waitresses, dancers, and models. Others are sold outright and moved around from place to place. Some know they will engage in prostitution but have no idea of the conditions that await them. Many are women whose vulnerabilities are preyed upon. The majority of women in prostitution have been sexually abused a a child.

∙    Once in the county of destination, women are held in apartments, bars, and make shift brothels where they service multiple men a day.  Many are raped, beaten, and confined under the worst of conditions.

∙    In most countries, various factors make it nearly impossible for trafficked women to seek assistance and to testify i against traffickers and other exploiters. These include death threats to their families, conditions of isolation and confinement, the violence and control within the sex industry, constant movement from place to place within a strange country, fear of deportation lack of shelters, no one will talk. 

∙    Many of the women I’ve interviewed, could talk about their troubles, but none of them would give their names. Many of these women I have worked with, in New Jersey, just about every dance club would have dance girls from other countries in them. They would tell me stories. 

∙    The most vulnerable are the women that have children. 

∙    I would do anything just to be with my children. (To be a mom and know.)

∙    Trafficking affects mostly all countries, and although not all have not been treated equally, there are countries, transit countries,and countries of destination, with some countries that are in crisis, no one cares about the poorest countries that are being affected the most. There are three categories in general, economic, social, and political crisis are more likely to turn there heads just to make money on that trade. For example the Philippines and Thailand, are countries are making sure they have plenty of women for the sex tourism. I have seen these girls get abused. 

∙    A few places tried that crap with me. Some of the owners would try to have sex with me and I would need to a hire body guard to watch my back. I’ve have picture taken of me for the internet. There is no discrimination about how they use, no one is safe. I’ve had owners take me in back rooms pull their privet parts out, and push me head down for me to have oral sex with them. Most times i was could walk aways, but there had times i knew i could not get away. either i give in or be beaten and raped at the same time.  I myself have been gang raped, It had been my firt day on the job. (I think my so called agent set that up. The shame I felt for years, and sometime i still do.) 

∙    The definition of Globalization and the sex industry,

∙    Globalization of the economy means it becomes an industry without borders. Large and small net trafficking works across borders, actively recruiting girls and women, especially from villages, city streets, and transportation centers.

Human Trafficking in the U.S.

by Delana Forsyth

i have been doing research on human trafficking for many years.

everything that i write i the truth.

things i have seen and experienced.

This was not an easy story for me to write. 

I must admit I hesitated to share some of my life experiences I feared the worst.

Of people’s rejection. I really don’t care any more what people think, this my healing point. It may break your heart to see it happening in other countries, it hurts even more that it is happening here and no one is doing anything about it. I was born an American and lived here all my life and never realized I had been a slave too. Human Trafficking is an American problem as well. I worked in New York when I was 20. the first day, I had only been there a few minutes the owner made me have sex with him. This had been in the lower east side of New York, You don’t say no or you could find yourself dead, or next to dead. By that time you wish you were. It’s not just the sex you get into, you have to be numb to all of this, so you start use drugs. Both go together no matter what. The violence is bad when you fight back. i learned after a while just to give in, don’t fight it can get you killed. We are only begun to scratch the surface in the fight against human trafficking. If there were on only one soul still being trafficked, our fight atrocity would continue, but the ugly truth is that there are millions. We have much more work remaining. Human trafficking exists in every state and nearly every city. If you look hard enough, in our nation’s small towns and in the countryside. In short the U.S. has a problem. We can all help by standing to stop this. I lived in Scranton, Pa all my life. My region consists of small, sleepy country, and towns. On the outside of town we have large farming communities, even the country roads there are not safe.

Not surprisingly, this area attracts convention and other gatherings, as ell as wealthy(some very wealthy) individuals looking for upscale and resort living. If human trafficking can happen my ton it can happen anywhere. NO community is immune. I have read many stories and seen many lives ended because of human lust for sex. Most of which are tragic. Human Trafficking occurs for many purposes. Most women and children are trafficked for prostitution, some for marriage, and many are exploited. Women who are trafficked for domestic labor often end up being sexually exploited as well. This is not just a problem for women; many children are trafficked for adoption.

∙    of any means everything to many poor countries. In these countries it has become increasingly high, especially in Africa children there are being trafficked for organs. There are enormous difficulties in producing accurate assessments of trafficking.

∙    The International Organization of Migration (IOM) attempted to estimate numbers of trafficked women in Europe for the European Union and concluded that accurate numbers were not possible.

∙    However, the United Nations estimates that trafficking is about a 5 to7 billion dollar operation annually. There are about 4 million (people) persons moved from one country to another and within countries.

∙    The U.S. government estimates that 50,000 women and children are trafficked each year into the United States, primarily from Latin America, Russia, the New Independent State, and Southeast Asia.

∙    Child sexual exploitation has grown especially in all countries, but especially in Asian and Latin America countries. Travel agencies, hotels, airlines, businesses,and so called, child protectors are often involved in sex tourism.

∙    Some child sexual abusers seems to think that they can avoid AIDS, if they have sex with children, but more often, they seek out children because can be made to fulfill the abuser demands.

∙    Organized crime is certainly involved in trafficking, but in many cases trafficker and pimp are small-scale operators who are husbands and boy-friends of victims. 

∙    Women trafficked into the United State, for example, often through other transit countries or across borders. The women are trafficked by cars, bus, boats, and planes.

∙    The condition of trafficking range from force or coercion to deception. Abuse of power, or abuse of a victim’s vulnerability. Many women are deceived into thinking they will work as domestic, waitresses, dancers, and models. Others are sold outright and moved around from place to place. Some know they will engage in prostitution but have no idea of the conditions that await them. Many are women whose vulnerabilities are preyed upon. The majority of women in prostitution have been sexually abused a a child.

∙    Once in the county of destination, women are held in apartments, bars, and make shift brothels where they service multiple men a day.  Many are raped, beaten, and confined under the worst of conditions.

∙    In most countries, various factors make it nearly impossible for trafficked women to seek assistance and to testify against traffickers and other exploiters. These include death threats to their families, conditions of isolation and confinement, the violence and control within the sex industry, constant movement from place to place within a strange country, fear of deportation lack of shelters, no one will talk. 

∙    Many of the women I’ve interviewed, would talk about their troubles, but none of them would give their names. Many of these women I have worked with, in New Jersey, just about every dance club would have dance girls from other countries in them. They would tell me stories. 

∙    The most vulnerable are the women that have children. 

∙    I would do anything just to be with my children. (To be a mom and know.)

∙    Trafficking affects mostly all countries, and although not all have not been treated equally, there are countries, transit countries,and countries of destination, with some countries that are in crisis, no one cares about the poorest countries that are being affected the most. There are three categories in general, economic, social, and political crisis are more likely to turn their heads just to make money on that trade. For example the Philippines and Thailand, are countries are making sure they have plenty of women for the sex tourism. I have seen these girls get abused. 

∙    A few places tried that crap with me. Some of the owners would try to have sex with me and I would need to a hire body guard to watch my back. I’ve have picture taken of me for the internet. There is no discrimination about how they use, no one is safe. I’ve had owners take me in back rooms pull their privet parts out, and push me head down for me to have oral sex with them. Most times i was could walk aways, but there had times i knew i could not get away. either i give in or be beaten and raped at the same time.  I myself have been gang raped, It had been my firt day on the job. (I think my so called agent set that up. The shame I felt for years, and sometime i still do.) 

∙    The definition of Globalization and the sex industry,

∙    Globalization of the economy means it becomes an industry without borders. Large and small net trafficking works across borders, actively recruiting girls and women, especially from villages, city streets, and transportation centers.             


https://www.utoledo.edu › hhs › htsjiWeb resultsHuman Trafficking and Social Justice Institute – The University of Toledo
People also search fortoledo humantrafficking 2019human traffickingtoledo mallwhy is ohio a hub forhuman traffickingthe federal trafficking victims protection actof 2000 identifies two forms of trafficking:why is ohio a humantrafficking hotspothuman traffickingcincinnatihuman traffickingin ohio by countyhuman traffickingconference 2020 dates

People also ask

What city in Ohio has the most human trafficking?

More resultsWhy is Ohio a hub for human trafficking?Ohio is particularly vulnerable to human trafficking because it has both large urban centers and rural counties and a large transient and immigrant population, as well as five major highways with easy access to other states and Canada. … 1,032 Ohio children are victims of human sex trafficking every year.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org › wiki

Human trafficking in Ohio – Wikipedia

More resultsWhat are the top cities for human trafficking?

What is Ohio ranked in human trafficking?

What is the #1 state for human trafficking?

How do human traffickers find their victims?

More resultsWhat are the stages of human trafficking?

Who is most likely to be a victims of human trafficking?

How many cases of human trafficking are in Ohio?Ohio Human Trafficking Cases 2014 – 2018Ohio Network of Children’s Advocacy CentersChild Welfare (SACWIS)No. Victims Identified (2017)9223No. Victims Identified (2018)17248No. Victims Identified (2019)24238Total (2014-2010)741258

Human TraffickingOhio has ranked as high as fifth among all states in total reported human trafficking cases with Toledo being identified as the fourth highest ranking city in the nation for recruiting victims into the illegal trade. Everyone has a role in ending human trafficking. Feb 10, 2020

We have only begun to scratch the surface in the fight against human trafficking. If there were only one soul still being trafficked, our fight against this atrocity would continue, but the ugly truth is that there are millions. We have much work remaining.

This story is to help regular citizens (if you can find one), understand what human trafficking is, how to recognize it, and what to do about it, without fear, when they see something that just not right. Human trafficking exists and is every real. It’s in every state across America, and in every city, small town, etc. no one is safe. But we all can do our part, talk about it LOUD. So the traffickers know we have eyes looking for them, and we all can stop this human slavery and demand on sex.

I was born and raised in Scranton, Pa. Only about 15 minutes from the beautiful Mount Pocono. NASCAR comes here twice a year, to Long Pond. My region consists of vacationing from New York or Jersey. We have large farming communities as well. Most people know each other. Small mom and pop stores. Most of the Poconos are known for Honeymooners and tourism, 365 days a year. If you ever visited Pennsylvania you’d know why. There is so much to do there. 

I have witnessed and experienced human trafficking for many years. This is not an easy story for me to write. I must admit I feared the worst, I hesitated to share my experiences. I feared rejections from loved ones, but I don’t really care anymore this is about me this is my healing point. It may break your heart to see human trafficking happening in other countries it hurts even more that it’s happening here in America and no one is doing anything about it. I was born in American and I am very happy President Trump has put the ban at our borders. We may not be able to stop the grouse exploitation, but he can help slow it down.

My hope is that this story saves some child or woman, yes young men reading this article. Yes they are victimized as well. I pray it encourages all of us to love as we want to be loved and willing to help. Fight against human trafficking and beyond. I’ve written stories I’ve seen and heard, stories that have broken my heart and, I suspect, will yours as well. It certainly broke my heart when I learned about what happened in other places around the globe. But when I understood what was happening here in America, in this country where I live and which I dearly love, I knew this is where I was called to make a difference. I have lived my entire life up and down the east coast of the U.S., and never realized that slavery still exists here. I am in agreement with others that are in the fight to stop human trafficking we need to speck out. None of us can be all things to all things to all people. We all will not last long if we go around kicking in doors of brothels and grabbing pimps by the neck. That will get us killed or near death. But those with a story to tell can fight back by telling your story. Writer’s with heart listen to the ones willing to talk. Because most of us who are writing these stories have been a victim of human trafficking. We can guide the victim to get help and let them know we are willing to help. Most of us can work to improve legislation, call the authorities when we see something that look suspiciously like human trafficking, and network with anti- trafficking organizations and agencies. By doing these things, we can take a stand together. We will save lives in every community in American. Once you realize how pervasive this tragedy of human trafficking is, I encourage you to get behind one or more of the an it trafficking groups, especially in you own city or town, and support them, volunteer your time. Just go set watch and listen. 

Unfortunately, the truth is sometimes worse than what you might imagine. Some stories have good endings, some not so good. 

How many people don’t think about the sale of human beings happening right here in America. If you consider the possibility of human trafficking within the borders, our assumption may be that it’s confined to Las Vegas, New York, Los Angeles, and other cities. Even those who recognize that human trafficking is as much as American disgrace as an international one sometimes don’t realize this crime don’t just occur in big cities. Although human trafficking has certainly been discovered in large urban areas, it can flourish in upper-class suburbs, rural areas, and even small towns like the one in which I lived.

Human trafficking happens in up-middle-upper class neighborhoods where business internationally  “invest” in domestic help, who upon arrival in America can become modern slaves. In search of cost-effective workforce, resort communities, hotels, and country clubs sometimes unknowingly hire agencies that are actually fronts for slave labor.

In places where regular conferences are held-including but not limited to political and business conferences- as well as at large sporting events, sex trafficked individuals are made available because traffickers know there are consumers with money who will buy them.

Even church elders have unwittingly supported human trafficking. That’s why I am presented with the reasonable (and sometimes, I must confess, not completely reasonable) opportunity to enlighten folks about the modern slavery that’s around us, I take it because I know the extent to which this problem permeates our land. It’s prominence here makes sense if you think about it. Human trafficking follows money, America, being the richest nation in the world, start D’s to reward traffickers with some of the highest profits anywhere. 

It may come as a surprise to learn that the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children estimates that well over one hundred thousand children are trafficked every year in America alone. While many of these young victims are runaways or foster children, others are from shat would be considered “good” families and have been lured or coerced in human trafficking by clever predators.“These predators are particularly adept at reading children and knowing what their vulnerabilities are.

But human trafficking in this country doesn’t just take place where sex is sold. Labor trafficking, which occurs on the street, in homes, factories, in fields, and any number of other places, is also big business.

Warning Signs of Human Trafficking

Since human trafficking is often a crime that is hidden in plain sight, it is important to be aware of its warning signs. Some indications that a person may be a victim of human trafficking include (especially in the case of women and children):

Appearing malnourished

Showing signs of physical injuries and abuse

Avoiding eye contact, social interaction, and authority figures/law enforcement

Seeming to adhere to scripted or rehearsed responses in social interaction

Lacking official identification documents

Appearing destitute/lacking personal possessions

Working excessively long hours

Living at place of employment

Checking into hotels/motels with older males, and referring to those males as boyfriend or “daddy,” which is often street slang for pimp

Poor physical or dental health 

Tattoos/ branding on the neck and/or lower back

Untreated sexually transmitted diseases

Small children serving in a family restaurant

Security measures that appear to keep people inside an establishment – barbed wire inside of a fence, bars covering the insides of windows

Not allowing people to go into public alone, or speak for themselves

These warning signs are adapted from information provided by the Polaris Project and its National Human Trafficking Resource Center and Innocents at Risk

Human trafficking is happening all around us.

Victims are often hidden away, but it is possible you will encounter individuals or situations of concern. Knowing how to ‘spot the signs’ could save lives.

The indicators below should be considered together and even if you are able to apply one or two or even three of the indicators to a person they are not necessarily trafficked. However, if you have any suspicions about human trafficking in your area you should report it.

Department of Justice Will NOT collect DATA on Native Human Trafficking Victims,

Resist calls to collect more data on trafficking of Native Americans despite pressure from advocates for Native Women and key members of Congress.

According to the department of federal authorities prosecuted just two trafficking cases in Indian county between 2013 and 2016. Only one of them resulted in a conviction.

The number pales in comparison to the 1,000 – plus cases that were prosecuted in other jurisdictions during the same time. It also flies in the face of a consistent stream of reports which show that Native Americans, especially women and girls, are victimized at a higher than any other racial or ethnic group in the United States.

Yet the department isn’t able to explain the disparity because federal agents aren’t required to determine whether a trafficking victim is Native American. And it doesn’t plan on collecting that data anytime soon.

“If it’s voluntary information, great, but we’re not going to mandate that,”

Tracy Toulou, a descendant of the Colville tribes who serves as the director of the Office of Tribal Justice, told the Senate Committee on Indian Affairs. 

According to Toulou, finding out whether a victim in Native American could end up hurting Native Americans. Service providers that receive federal funds shouldn’t be forced to collect the data because he said it would have a “chilling effect” by making people more reluctant to come forward. ” WE don’t want to do anything that’s going to keep a victim from coming to our victim services providers and getting the services they need,”  Toulou said,  who is a career employee, not a political appointee of the Trump administration, which did not send a more higher-level official to the long-planned hearing.

The explantion stood in contrast to the stance taken by another federal agency. Jason Thompson, the deputy director of the Office of Justice Service at the Bureau of Indian Affairs, said he hasn’t heard concerns about collecting data on Native Trafficking victims.  “BIA-OJS, as of 2014 does collect that information in our basic crime reporting,” said Thompson, who is a citizen of the Cherokee Nation. Like Toulow, he is a career employee of the federal government. 

The lack of data limits the way in which the federal government can help a victim, according to Nicole Matthews, the executive director of Minnesota Indian Women’s Sexual assault Coalition.

Be aware of these coalitions, most are fronts may trafficker are the sponsoring these coaltions. The University of Toledo has had conference’s for the past 17 or 18 years. And, yet Toledo is number five.

I would like to raise money to build a Human Trafficking safe house for all who need help all over America. To protect those who don’t how to protect themselves, no matter who you are, because Human Trafficking does not discriminate. I know that better then anyone.