JOEL 2:28 < And it shall come to pass afterward, that I will pour out my spirit upon all;

and your sons and your daughters shall prophesy, your old men dream dreams, your young men shall see visions: 29 < And also upon the handmaids in those days will I pour out my spirit.

MRS . RS . WRIGHT began her work at once . She soon gathered a class of Indian girls for daily instruction and training in useful arts . She traveled over the rough roads and through the swamps and streams on horseback , with saddlebags securely fas tened to her side . In these she carried food , medi cine , etc. She not only visited the Indian homes ; she looked after the distant , lonely teachers — Miss Asenath Bishop , Miss Rebecca Newhall , and Miss Phebe Selden , who were teaching , and keeping house in small log schoolhouses , miles away from the mis sion station . Miss Bishop , who went to the Senecas in 1823 , and labored with untiring zeal during eighteen years , was noted in the tribe for her wonderful patience under manifold persecutions . To illustrate : the larger boys of her school one day devised a scheme by which they hoped to gain a victory over this unendurable calm . Arriving at her little schoolhouse one bitter cold morning , she prepared with benumbed fingers to build a fire . Upon opening the door , she found the stove packed with snow . She stood a moment in bewildered surprise , and then , realizing the situation , calmly took the stove shovel and the water pail and without a word or change of expression began to shovel out the snow . Before she had half filled the pail she heard a rustle , then a scrambling from behind the benches , and half a dozen Indian boys leaped into the air , shouting , “ Miss Bishop ! He can’t mad ! Miss Bishop ! He can’t mad ! ” The shovel and pail were taken from her , the stove cleaned out , and a good fire made by those young rogues , who said years afterward , “ We boys gloried in her spunk ! ” The following characterization illustrates “ Indian English . ” Miss Bishop missed Mr. Little Johnny John from church , and asked Deacon Fish Hook what had become of him : ” Miss Bishop , ” said the deacon , using with pride the English at his command , “ Little Johnny John he not good ! Much afraid just like this : devil — you know him — he got chain round Little Johnny John’s neck . Well , sometimes devil hold chain loose ; then Little Johnny John think : “ I go see ; maybe Christian good ; maybe I like it ; I go to meeting . Well , devil say : • I watch ; I let him go little while ; I see ! ‘ Little Johnny John he come to meeting . He think , Pretty good ’ ; so he come to meeting again . He like it good deal . He say , I will be Christian . ‘ Devil let chain out little more , little more . Little Johnny John pretty good Christian . By – and – by devil think : ‘ I don’t know ; maybe guess he go too far ; maybe lose him ! ‘ So devil he pull it – – chain ! Pull it – chain ! and Little Johnny John he go back he go back . Now Little Johnny John no good . Devil hold chain pretty tight now ; guess Little Johnny John he can’t repent now ; guess devil – he can’t willing . ” Deacon Fish Hook was a true prophet . Little Johnny John returned to paganism . In her visits from house to house , Mrs. Wright con stantly used the Indian phrases she had acquired , and daily added others , until in an incredibly short time she spoke the language fluently , and was able to ren der valuable assistance to her husband , who was also a natural linguist . During his life he acquired seven different languages . He not only mastered the very difficult Seneca tongue , so that he could preach in it , but set to work to establish a system of orthography by the aid of which the Indian tongue could be reduced to written characters . In this he was successful , and with the help of his young wife put his system to practical use by translating into it a hymn book , the Four Gospels , and portions of the Old Testament . They likewise procured the type , and printed these like it good deal . He say , I will be Christian . ‘ Devil let chain out little more , little more . Little Johnny John pretty good Christian . By – and – by devil think : ‘ I don’t know ; maybe guess he go too far ; maybe lose him ! ‘ So devil he pull it – – chain ! Pull it – chain ! and Little Johnny John he go back he go back . Now Little Johnny John no good . Devil hold chain pretty tight now ; guess Little Johnny John he can’t repent now ; guess devil – he can’t willing . ” Deacon Fish Hook was a true prophet . Little Johnny John returned to paganism . In her visits from house to house , Mrs. Wright con stantly used the Indian phrases she had acquired , and daily added others , until in an incredibly short time she spoke the language fluently , and was able to ren der valuable assistance to her husband , who was also a natural linguist . During his life he acquired seven different languages . He not only mastered the very difficult Seneca tongue , so that he could preach in it , but set to work to establish a system of orthography by the aid of which the Indian tongue could be reduced to written characters . In this he was successful , and with the help of his young wife put his system to practical use by translating into it a hymn book , the Four Gospels , and portions of the Old Testament . They likewise procured the type , and printed these books themselves . They compiled a spelling book for the school children , and partly completed a dictionary in the Seneca tongue . Mr. Wright imparted his knowledge of medicine to his wife , and they were both widely sought by the sick and suffering , not only among the Indians , but among the surrounding whites as well . They gave medical service , without con pensation , to all who applied . Within a few months after the arrival of these mis sionaries , the cholera broke out and wrought sad havoc among the Senecas ; but through all the dreadful weeks that followed , Mr. and Mrs. Wright were constantly at the bedside of the sick and dying , ministering to their physical and spiritual wants without thought or fear for themselves . The first church edifice among the Senecas was a plain frame building painted white . Two services were held there every Sabbath , and it was always cus tomary for a large part of the audience to visit the Mission House at noon , and there be made happy with the ” white man’s bread . ” This hospitality helped the Indian to travel many miles , and to reach the church before noon at least . White people sometimes passed through the Reservation , and while receiving the hos pitality of the Mission House became acquainted with the interesting young missionary , and soon it came to pass that every one , whether Indian or pale face , loved her and came to her for advice and consolation . In after years her influence became all – important in coun teracting the evil effects of treachery and cupidity dis played too often by the whites toward the Indians . It has been said that to her personal influence , teach ing , and example was largely due the fact that so many of these Indians embraced Christianity . After fourteen months of uninterrupted companion ship with her husband , and successful work by his side and under his direction , the young missionary is left alone a few days and avails herself of this opportunity to write her first letter as a wife . MY ROOM , April 9 , 1834 . Dear Husband , – As much as I dreaded to have you leave me , I have almost wished sometimes that I could have an opportunity to write one letter to you , and after you went away to – day I thought I would sit down and write to you . You will see that I have been arranging your desk . I hope you will be pleased with it . There were so many things which have no kind of relation to each other that I could hardly find places for them all . I fear you may dis cover some confusion among your papers . I look the liberty of reading a few of Martha’s letters . I have prayed much that I might be like her as far as she was like Christ . I feel sensible that I am not much like her . Last night I thought I felt some as Abra bam did when a horror of great darkness fell upon him . I could see no light , and it seemed as though my prayers were an empty noise . I hope I feel more comfort to – day , though I scarcely re strain the tears a moment . I hope you pray for me , my husband , thought I do not wish to trust at all in your prayers . I think I desire to trust in God alone . Perhaps you will think me childish to write a letter to you when I expect to see you so soon ; but I thought it would be so pleasant to write “ dear husband ” and then to subscribe myself “ Your affectionate wife.” Twenty months of united missionary work and Mr. Wright was called to the other Seneca Reservations to assist the resident missionaries in a protracted meet ing . ” And so one cold morning in December , accom panied by his guide and interpreter , Indian Robert , he started on that difficult and dangerous journey of thirty miles through the almost unbroken woods to the Cattaraugus Reservation , and from there forty miles farther on to the Allegheny Reservation . Mrs. Wright , with a heart burdened with anxious fore bodings , bade him good – by and promised to keep a daily record of her life and work to be sent to him by the first trusty messenger traveling in the same direc tion . A few sheets of this record , giving us a glimpse of her life at that time , have been preserved . SENECA MISSION , December , 1835 . My dear Husband , – According to my promise I must com mence a letter this evening , although much fatigued , having just returned from a visit to Mary King , whom I found in a most dis tressing situation . She said she had not clothes enough to keep her warm , and at times was very hungry indeed . Her bed con sisted of one blanket , spread on a couple of boards . She did not think she could live long , for she found it extremely difficult to get into the house to – day when she went out . Peter went with us as interpreter . Everything to – day has gone well , only I am lone some to – night , and can’t help thinking of the Cattaraugus woods and hoping that you are not in them . Sunday evening . Assisted to – day in moving Mary King . After I left her last night she coughed up a great deal of thick , bloody matter , which indicates an ulcer , does it not ? She is very com fortably situated now at Mrs. Seneca’s ; and I hope to visit her often and minister to the wants of both soul and body . As for myself , I hardly know what to tell you . I still find in myself the same proneness to forget the solemn things of eternity , although I am surrounded with so much to remind me of them . Monday evening . I have tried to do my washing to – day , and have succeeded pretty well . I learn that there is trouble again between Greenblanket and his wife . How sad to have such a re proach thrown upon the cause of Christ ! When will Christians learn to live in peace ? What a question ! As if Christians could live in a quarrel ! Alas , that we should possess so little of the spirit of our Master ! Tuesday evening . Deacon Blue Eyes came this evening , and is to spend the night with us . We expect to kill hogs to – morrow . Thermometer eight degrees below zero to – day . I took cold yes terday , and have a dreadful face , I assure you . Can scarcely see out of my left eye . My jaw is somewhat painful and I have been obliged to keep still all day . Your letter was truly welcome , and the more so as it was entirely unexpected . You were in the woods at the very time I feared . I should not have slept that night had I known that . You must not do so again ! No , no ! You must be willing to stop where darkness overtakes you , and not risk your life and health by traveling in the night . I am glad you have bought a cow , and I shall do my best to make a great deal of butter , but you must not form too high expectations . Monday evening . Well , my dear husband , you see I have skipped a few days . My face was so painful Friday and Satur day that I dared not write lest I should communicate some of my pain . Sunday forenoon a large swelling between my cheek and jaw broke , and I felt almost immediate relief and have continued to mend since . Daniel Two Guns ‘ youngest child is quite sick and they fear it will die . I send you your compass , that you may have a guide through the woods . But oh , keep near to the great Guide of feeble , wan dering sinners ! There is safety only there , and peace only there . Tell Indian Robert he will need a true compass to guide him through the wilderness of this world , where are a thousand snares into which he may fall at any moment . I should like to join you at the missionary meeting if I could consistently do so , but I do not wish to leave one duty undone for the sake of going.

Author: Delana Zakrzewski

I am saved by the most High God for others sins against me any sins against the Lord God Almighty, Whose Son Jesus, washed us all of our sin by His presuses blood and beat death, by walking out of the Tomb

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