Believers Obedience in The Only Living God: Jesus is Lord!

For when he dies he can take none of it along; his goods cannot follow him down
Psalms 49:18 (The Israel Bible™)
כִּי לֹא בְמוֹתוֹ יִקַּח הַכֹּל לֹא־יֵרֵד אַחֲרָיו כְּבוֹדוֹ
KEE LO b’-mo-TO yi-KAKH ha-KOL lo yay-RAYD a-kha-RAV k’-vo-DO
Learn Hebrew!יֵרֵד [yerayd]VERB: Go downThe Bible relates that after Solomon (Shlomo in Hebrew) becomes king of Israel, he has a dream. In his dream, God appears and offers to grant him one wish. Instead of requesting wealth or long life, Shlomo humbly asks for wisdom so that he can properly judge the people. God is pleased with his decision, and rewards him not only with wisdom, but with wealth and honor as well. Upon waking the next morning, he comes to Jerusalem and offers sacrifices, expressing his gratitude to the Lord (I Kings 3:5-14). In making his request, Shlomo demonstrates that he understands the message of this verse: Those things that most people chase, wealth and fortune, are the most fleeting.
Exclusive Footage of the Fire At Mount Moriah
Terrorists sought to attack worshipers at the Western Wall below when they fired an incendiary that stuck the trees on the Temple Mount, causing a fire that has not happened there since the Second Temple’s destruction in 70 CE!

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Dear delana ,

Have you ever known someone who put up a barrier that prevented true communication? Sometimes when talking to certain people, I’ve felt like there was a wall of cold steel between us. In moments like that, I find myself wishing the person could open their heart just a little. Do you know why this happens? Oftentimes, it’s because that person has a poor self-image and is afraid to let others see who they really are. But God wants—and has provided—so much more for His children.

What do you see when you look in the mirror? Your self-image is the mental picture you paint of yourself. It’s important to develop it correctly, because how you think, feel, speak, and act flows out of it.

The shaping of your self-image began very early when you were a baby, and continues throughout your life. Your mental self-perception is influenced by the words of others as well as your own experiences. But because our hearts are self-deceiving (Jer. 17:9), we’re prone to a distorted view of ourselves. The only one who truly knows and understands us is God. By going to His Word, we’ll gain the right insight into who we truly are.

Paul is an example of someone who had a balanced self-image. We catch a glimpse of this in 1 Corinthians 15:8-10. After listing those who had the privilege of seeing the risen Christ, Paul declared with humility that he was the last one to see the Lord. What was Paul’s journey from an earlier, distorted view to this more accurate self-perception?

Before his conversion, Paul had too high an opinion of himself. He had reached the top tier of Judaism and was confident as a Pharisee that his obedience to the law had earned him God’s approval and acceptance (Phil. 3:4-6). He was so convinced of his self-righteous beliefs that he persecuted the church. It took a visit from Jesus on the Damascus road to open Paul’s mind to the truth that he was a sinner in need of a Savior.

After, Paul humbly adjusted his self-image to a more accurate assessment. He said, “Whatever things were gain to me, these things I have counted as loss because of Christ” (Phil. 3:7-8). When he wrote to the Corinthians, he described himself as “the least of the apostles, and not fit to be called an apostle, because I persecuted the church of God” (1 Cor. 15:9).

Now, you might think Paul must have had a terrible self-image at this point. How could he possibly get over the guilt of what he’d done? Perhaps you feel this way about yourself. Is past sin dogging your steps, dragging you down into discouragement, and distorting your selfimage? Do you let your failures shape how you see yourself? If so, learn from Paul’s example.

Paul viewed himself as God saw him. He didn’t let past failures shape his identity. He left them behind so he could pursue Christ. At salvation, Paul became a new person, all due to God’s grace: “But by the grace of God I am what I am” (1 Cor. 15:10). Paul didn’t develop a self-loathing attitude once he recognized his sins. Instead, he saw himself through the lens of biblical truth.

That’s what God wants for every believer. We don’t have to live the rest of our lives with a distorted view of ourselves, living in bondage to a low or high self-image. The Lord wants us to have a balanced perception based on Scripture. Ephesians 1:3-14 tells us how God sees us. We are His chosen, beloved children who are redeemed, forgiven, and lavished with grace.

Finally, Paul lived in his new self-image given to him by God’s grace. He didn’t rest after salvation, but kept pressing forward to become the person God created him to be and accomplish what he’d been called to do. Paul said, “His grace toward me did not prove vain; but I labored even more than all of them [the other apostles], yet not I, but the grace of God with me” (1 Cor. 15:10).

The purpose of a balanced self-image is not just so we can feel good about ourselves and relate well to others, but so God can use us as He desires. He’s transforming us into His Son’s image (Rom. 8:29) and accomplishing His will as He empowers our love, service, and obedience.

Many things distort self-perception—guilt from past sin, criticism, failures, and comparison to others are just a few. But these are not true markers of who you are. In Christ, you are a new creation and have been given a new self, made in the likeness of God. That is who you truly are.

The way to develop a balanced self-image is to saturate yourself with God’s Word. Learn what He says about you. Then begin living in those truths by faith, knowing that God is the one transforming you into Christ’s image. He’s working in and through you so you can serve Him effectively, interact with others in an open, godly manner, and see yourself as He does. If you’ll take hold of His truths and let them shape your emotions and behavior, you’ll discover the true you.

One of the first Scripture memory verses that our children learned was “Children, obey your parents in the Lord: for this is right” (Ephesians 6:1 KJV). Most people expect that children should be taught to obey, however they rarely understand that obedience is for not only the children, but for everyone.

nullIn our ministry we teach Biblical Parenting classes and the definition and Biblical concepts of obedience are taught during the “Discipline – Part 1″ class. Obedience is often confused with submission; however, the two words differ in this way:

  • Obey – The Biblical word for “obey” comes from the Greek “hupakou” which means to listen attentively; by implication to heed or conform to a command or authority. This word conveys the idea of actively following a command. There is no choice in the matter, it is to be done whether one agrees with it or not. Obedience is involuntary.
  • Submit – The Biblical word “submit” comes from the Greek “hupeiko” which means to yield; to passively surrender to an authority. Submission is similar to obedience but in this case one might question what is being commanded. Submission is voluntary. 

When is it a good time to start a Devotional? The beginning of the year? Tomorrow? How about RIGHT NOW!

The Gospel Project takes men and women on a chronological, Christ-centered journey through the storyline of Scripture.

Our 13-session summer study is All Things New.

Examine the life of Paul and discover how through all the adversity, struggles, and persecution that he experienced, Jesus was present, powerful, and in control, just as He is with all believers.

Therefore, we can live in grace, strive for unity, defend the faith, and obey our Lord, overflowing with His love for us.

Why obedience is important to God. In our daily life, we know that obedience is a very essential habit one should abide to in our homes, workplaces and in the communities in which we live. In simple terms, obedience is compliance with an order, request, law or submission to another’s authority.

In our daily life, we know that obedience is a very essential habit one should abide to in our homes, workplaces and in the communities in which we live. In simple terms, obedience is compliance with an order, request, law or submission to another’s authority.

The bible also talks a lot about obedience as it is seen in many scriptures.

Children are asked to obey their parents in Ephesians 6:1 as this is the right way to behave as a child in a family. “Children, obey your parents in the Lord, for this is right”

In Colossians 3:18, Wives are also called upon to be submissive to their partners as this is fitting with the lord. “Wives, submit yourselves to your husbands, as is fitting in the Lord”

Husbands too are asked to treat their wives with respect in 1peter 3:7 which says, “Husbands, in the same way be considerate as you live with your wives, and treat them with respect as the weaker partner and as heirs with you of the gracious gift of life, so that nothing will hinder your prayers”

We see in Philippians 2:8 that even Jesus showed obedience to death and death on the cross. “And being found in appearance as a man, he humbled himself by becoming obedient to death even death on a cross” hence why the bible stresses it an essential part of the Christian faith.

Mathew 16:24 teaches us that as Christians, the fact that we deny ourselves from many worldly desires and choose to follow Christ, that is obedience. “Then Jesus said to his disciples, “Whoever wants to be my disciple must deny themselves and take up their cross and follow me.”

The book of John 14:15, reminds us that through obeying the 10 commandments, we show our love for Jesus. “If you love me, keep my commandments.”

Jesus also tells us in John 14:23 that in the same act of love for him, we must comply with whatever God has commanded for it is our duty to do so.

“Jesus replied, ‘Anyone who loves me will obey my teaching. My Father will love them, and we will come to them and make our home with them.”

However, Jesus condemns hypocrisy in the act of obedience to the law. Speaking to the Pharisees, he said that despite of our deeds, without Christ, even our best and most righteous works are as “filthy rags”.

“Woe to you, teachers of the law and Pharisees, you hypocrites! You are like whitewashed tombs, which look beautiful on the outside but on the inside are full of the bones of the dead and everything unclean. 28 In the same way, on the outside you appear to people as righteous but on the inside you are full of hypocrisy and wickedness.”

As Christians, we are asked to obey the law of Christ which is the law of love as it is seen in John 13:34. “A new command I give you: Love one another. As I have loved you, so you must love one another”

Jesus also asks us to love our neighbors as we love ourselves for this is the second greatest commandment that he gave to his disciples.

“And the second is like it: ‘Love your neighbor as yourself.’All the Law and the Prophets hang on these two commandments.”

In Galatians 6:2, we learn that when we love God and obey him, we naturally have love for one another. “Carry each other’s burdens, and in this way you will fulfill the law of Christ”

Author: Delana Forsyth

My strength is God’s the Spirit flowing through me. I am a Christian, I believe in Jesus the Son of God. God the Father God the Son God the Holy Spirit.

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